SAN CLEMENTE YOUTH NEED MEASURE H
SUSAN PARMELEE, San Clemente

Please vote yes on Measure H and Prop 13; both are vital to the capital improvements that our local schools drastically need to ensure our children continue to receive high quality education.

Please note that if Prop 13 passes (and it is predicted to pass) without Measure H, we will be paying for state bonds that we do not benefit from—these funds are only available in conjunction with the passing of a local bond measure.

Contrary to other opinions published in the Dana Point Times, Capistrano Unified School District has a detailed plan for use of Measure H and includes provisions for public oversight and independent audit procedures.

The mechanism that determines state funding allocations to school districts leaves CUSD in the lowest ranks of dollars per pupil, and these monies are only for operating and maintaining schools.

Capital improvements to schools in the state of California are only funded through the passing of state and local bond measures. No other funding exists to complete all necessary vital improvements.

Without Measure H, our schools will continue to deteriorate. A large portion of Measure H funds are designated for San Clemente High School, with the remainder going to elementary and middle schools in San Clemente and Capo Beach.

San Clemente High School (and all of our San Clemente elementary and middle schools) has fantastic teachers, staff, administration, and students. However, the world class education they receive takes place on a 55-year-old campus that no longer meets the technological or environmental needs of our youth and education professionals.

If you would like to see the plans for updating the campus to 21st-century standards, visit the Capistrano Unified School District website. Or take advantage of the upcoming school facility walks led by Principal Chris Carter (contact SCHS for more details).

As a parent of three San Clemente High School alums, I look forward to a real auditorium for our talented musicians and theater performers, a pool that is up to the level of our fine aquatic athletes, classrooms adequately wired for today’s technology, and adequate administrative office space for the administration and support staff.

Let’s give our children the learning environment they deserve and need.

About The Author Dana Point Times

comments (3)

  • When will the schools get enough money? It appears never. Every election, election after election more taxpayer’s money is sent to the schools. I can’t help but wonder,where does all that money go? Remember why we voted in the Lotto? The schools needed more money!
    I am sure there is yet another proposition being readied for November’s election. Once again the schools will need more taxpayer’s money.

  • What is the “mechanism” to keep the CUSD from continuing to blow through money? As you drive to work tomorrow, marvel at the edifice that is the administrative campus next to the freeway. It’s state of the art, but our schools are not. Until CUSD can learn to control their own budget, they should not get any more of our dollars. Ask yourself–if the overall budget of CUSD is over 90% teacher and administrative payroll-and that these employees are still on a pension system, what happens when the economy goes South? The taxpayers are STILL on the hook for the pension liability. Will CUSD complain? Of course? But did they DO ANYTHING ABOUT IT? No, not yet.

    Until CUSD switches to a 401K retirement plan–which can be just as ROBUST as a pension–they should not get any more money.

  • Cord, you don’t make a lick of sense. CUSD has a budget and they stay within it. What are you talking about?

    If you’re serious about keeping kids at risk and not investing in our own local schools until the massive teachers union goes to 401ks, (which they wouldn’t, they would be 403bs) you’re nuts. Please talk about these concerns with a trusted adult who can make a diagnosis.

comments (3)

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