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Deemed fit for release, does the recirculation of predators cause endless issues?

Straight Talk: By Al Jacobs
Straight Talk: By Al Jacobs

By Al Jacobs

On May 23, 2014, a Superior Court Judge in Orange County sentenced 32-year-old Travis Batten to 107 years imprisonment on seven counts, including forcible rape. Upon sentencing, the judge told Batten, whose assaults were committed over a five-year period, “You are a violent sexual predator that poses an immense danger to the public if ever released.”

On the same day, a Superior Court Judge in Santa Clara County ordered that 63-year-old serial rapist Christopher Hubbart be released from confinement. Hubbart acknowledged raping and assaulting 40 women between 1971 and 1982, when sentenced to prison.

Paroled in 1990, he was committed to a state mental hospital after committing another attack just two months after. Doctors at the hospital recently declared him fit for release. He’ll wear a GPS monitor on his ankle and be accompanied by security people when in public.

I have a few rhetorical questions. Why only 107 years when 307 would sound more impressive at the judge’s next reelection campaign? When will Travis Batten be declared by some doctors to be fit for release? How many persons make their living by re-circulating vicious predators in a process that never ends? What must be done?

We may scrutinize statutes as to their effectiveness, debate the fairness of capital punishment and philosophize on the judicial system. But basic to the problem is this fundamental truth: Any society unable to dispose of its refuse may expect to be engulfed by it.

Al Jacobs, a longtime Dana Point resident and a professional investor for nearly a half century, distributes a monthly newsletter in which he shares financial knowledge and experience. It is available at www.roadtoprosperity.net

In an effort to provide our readers with a wide variety of opinions from our community, the Dana Point Times provides Guest Opinion opportunities in which selected columnists’ opinions are shared. The opinions expressed in these columns are entirely those of the columnist alone and do not reflect those of the DP Times or Picket Fence Media. If you would like to respond to this column, please email us at editorial@danapointtimes.com.

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comments (4)

  • “Any society unable to dispose of its refuse may expect to be engulfed by it.” Refuse? You’re part of the problem, pal. Those ‘refuse’ are part of the human condition, always there and always to be planned about. There are no surprises, and if instead of seeking to pour the dirt over them so they are unseen, efforts should be made to address the issues before they become problems. But of course that will cost money, and that’s the last thing those who work so diligently to take all they can before only refuse is left will work to prevent.

  • “Any society unable to dispose of its refuse may expect to be engulfed by it.” Our ‘refuse’? These are part of the human condition, you can count on them being a part. But instead of seeking to treat and prevent, possibly the least costly method to address the problem, we seek to ‘dispose of its refuse’. This is exactly of what we see in our society today, take what we can and leave the refuse for someone else to ‘dispose’ of. The untaxed trillions stolen and sequestered off shore are exactly a reference to that effort, to leave the refuse behind. Our investors like that.

  • I have written two responses, both ignored. Does this system work or not? Please respond, or I’ll quit wasting my time.

  • “Any society unable to dispose of its refuse may expect to be engulfed by it.” Our ‘refuse’? These are part of the human condition, you can count on them being a part. But instead of seeking to treat and prevent, possibly the least costly method to address the problem, we seek to ‘dispose of its refuse’. This is exactly of what we see in our society today, take what we can and leave the refuse for someone else to ‘dispose’ of. The untaxed trillions stolen and sequestered off shore are exactly a reference to that effort, to leave the refuse behind. Our investors like that, they can have more by avoiding taxes needed to address the ‘refuse’ problem, and at the same time ‘dispose’ of the problem. Of course, it won’t go away.

comments (4)

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