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Parents and students are dressed in neon-green T-shirts on Wednesday, Feb. 24 in support of the establishment of a Global Business Academy charter school within the Capistrano Unified School District Board of Trustees meeting. Photo: Eric Heinz
Parents and students are dressed in neon-green T-shirts on Wednesday, Feb. 24 in support of the establishment of a Global Business Academy charter school within the Capistrano Unified School District Board of Trustees meeting. Photo: Eric Heinz

By Eric Heinz

Capistrano Unified School District Board of Trustees were vocal in their dissatisfaction of the application submitted for a new charter school, Global Business Academy, during the Wednesday, Feb. 24 meeting.

Among the trustees’ concerns, GBA’s lack of a proposed location for the school, inconsistencies between reports of agreements between it and University of California-Irvine, the lesson structure presented and the amount of time the charter school would have to become operational by the start of the 2016-2017 school year.

GBA representatives said their school intends to make students more competitive in their technological and entrepreneurial education. The instruction also would evaluate student performance and place students in learning environments based on that performance; those who learn a subject faster would be placed in accelerated programs while those who learn a subject slower would be placed in slower-paced programs.

Catherine Sanchirico, a GBA founding member, said during the presentation the agreements with UCI would allow for professors to speak with students and the school may be able to use some of the university’s facilities.

Contrarily, Trustee Gila Jones said she had received letters from UCI denying any special agreements, rather they were the opportunities any school has to utilize (with some caveats) and that she thought the presentation disingenuous.

Sanchirico said she was led to believe otherwise.

Other concerns from Trustees included what they described as an overly ambitious curriculum that would overburden students.

During the public comment portion of the meeting, two people, including Capistrano Valley High School teacher Jim Corbett and Capistrano Unified Education Association President Sally Smith, spoke out against the establishment of the school. Corbett said the school would drain resources from CUSD and White said the state’s looming teacher shortage would not be able to accommodate the school.

Seventeen parents and students, four students from Dana Hills High School, spoke in favor of GBA’s proposal of giving students a more competitive edge in technology and entrepreneurial skills.

The next hearing for GBA is expected to take place at the March 23 CUSD meeting.

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