Cameras provide up-to-date readings of south Orange County state beach conditions

Surfers make their way to the Trestles surf break at San Onofre State Beach. Upgraded video equipment from a California State Parks and Surfline/Wavetrak, Inc.  partnership gives viewers better weather and wave readings of Upper and Lower Trestles from home. Photo by Brett Shoaf
Surfers make their way to the Trestles surf break at San Onofre State Beach. Upgraded video equipment from a California State Parks and Surfline/Wavetrak, Inc. partnership gives viewers better weather and wave readings of Upper and Lower Trestles from home. Photo by Brett Shoaf

By Andrea Papagianis

Cameras and live-video feeds providing beachgoers the at-home opportunity to view seaside conditions on state beaches throughout Orange County received upgrades over the past few months bringing loungers, surfers and swimmers better readings of weather and waves.

A partnership between California State Parks and Surfline/Wavetrak, Inc. has brought upgraded video equipment and feeds directly onto state property at beaches and breaks from Bolsa Chica to Trestles. While Surfline had video capabilities at state beaches before, equipment was located off state property.

Now, cameras have been moved to better vantage points on state property at Doheny, San Clemente and San Onofre state beaches, said Brian Ketterer, California State Park Superintendent for the Orange Coast District. Additionally, what was once a hand-held camera at both Upper and Lower Trestles has been upgraded to a digital device, providing images that are uploaded to Surfline’s website throughout the day.

“The addition of cameras and improvement of the video feeds is great for our local state parks and fantastic for our visitors,” Ketterer said in a press release.

The upgraded feeds—both live and delayed—can be viewed for free at www.surfline.com. Individual break pages on Surfline’s site also provide tide charts, wind data and water temperatures.

“From the comfort of their home, surfers and swimmers can observe up-to-date ocean conditions and make a decision on the best place for them to come out and recreate,” Ketterer added.

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